The making of … a beautiful landscape pendant.

Finished pendant on bust
Finished pendant on bust

I just realised that I posted my last entry in May. Upps. Well to be fair I have been very busy making things and taking part in a three-day polymer clay workshop Polydays, which took place in September in a small village called Toddington. It was taught by some of the world’s best polymer clay artists – Carol Simmons, Alison Gallant and Bettina Welker and it was quite intense – and back breaking. I came away with lots of new techniques and unfinished projects – as most of the projects taught were quite time consuming. In the next weeks I will finish those projects ( a reversible necklace, a hinged bracelet and beautiful Mokume Gane slices which I will use for pendants and bracelets.) and will write a bit more about Polydays.

In the meantime I wanted to share how I made this pendant:

Finished pendant - landscape
Finished pendant – landscape

On the final day of the Polydays workshop Alison Gallant showed our group how to create her reversible necklace and also how to create Mokume Gane canes with ripple effect  – a great technique that creates beautiful patterns. Somehow though I wasn’t so happy how they turned out when I cut them and placed them on the clay – so I mashed up the clay and put it through the pasta machine a few times -and the colours changed into something I really liked – so I cut out some small circles, used some of them for the necklace and the rest for future projects.

Small cabochons in polymer clay
Small cabochons in polymer clay

When my sister visited us last week I showed her all my “leftover” cabochons and let her choose one, which was this one:

Detail of landscape cabochon
Detail of landscape cabochon

To be honest I would have chosen the exact same as it reminds me of landscape paintings by one of  my favourite artists William Turner (who I also studied during my MA).  Next I created a frame for it, let her choose the colour, texture and hanging (just simple holes) and baked it. The tricky bit was to attach the rather thin cabochon to the frame – I added an extra layer of raw clay and used FIMO liquid to adhere it. After baking I varnished it with Satin varnish. The clay I used was Premo and Premo Accents which comes in beautiful colours. I am new to Premo, having used mainly Fimo previously, but since the Polydays I love it as it doesn’t leave too much of a residue on my pasta machine, which is normally a pain to clean and I often spend more time cleaning the machine then actually working with the clay!

Anyway I hope you like the resulting pendant. I am planning to make more landscape pendants in the near future.

Update:  You can now find my landscape range here

5 Responses

  1. Mossy
    | Reply

    Wow, this is so beautiful. Thanks for sharing some of the process of how it was made 🙂

    • helen
      | Reply

      Thanks for your kind comments Mossy:)

  2. […] I also made some extra tops as I had a lot of clay to play with and they inspired me to create my own landscape range . I hope that at some point I will be able to re-create the accidental technique that resulted in these landscapes. You can find a blog post about the landscape range here. […]

  3. Marry Mathews
    | Reply

    Really amazing . This is so pretty . It is a very innovative idea for giving natural touch to jewelery . Thank you for images .

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